Grain-free raspberry pancakes for breakfast

I’ve long ago given up on trying to be too clever about breakfasts. Life’s too short, and I’m normally in too much of a rush. If I’m lucky, the kids will eat something from each food group – normally Oatabix or nukruwaved porridge, made with, if I’ve been organised and bought it from Broadway Market, some raw milk which I add after the porridge has been radiated, some fruit or juice and some omega threes. Sometimes I’m lazy and give them toast. What’s easiest is often what’s best, as far as I’m concerned.

Depending on what my day looks like, I’ll have a raw (organic) egg blitzed up in orange or grapefruit juice, along with some or all of: chia, flax or poppy seeds, and or wheat germ. If I’m feeling adventurous, I might add some parsley, which I have growing on my kitchen windowsill. I’m someone who will knock back green sludge if I was told it was good for me – taste it never my top priority, especially in the mornings. In the illustrious words of Vidal Sassoon, I just want to wash my hair and go.

But, with more time on my hands comes less morning rush and more time to surf Twitter, so when this recipe popped up on my timeline (yes, I do follow Vogue, but mainly to troll them), I thought I’d give it a go – adapted of course to the ingredients I have in my kitchen.

I feel quite inspired by the Hemsley sisters, who I discovered when I was doing GAPs – a diet that avoids grains and introduces fermented foods in an attempt to heal my gut, which, I felt, years of antibiotics for skin problems had put out of whack. The Hemsley sisters use similar principles in their recipes, but do it in a far more photogenic and aspirational way than straightforward GAPs. But in any case, I am used to making grain-free pancakes as these form a big part of GAPs stage three, which introduces solidish food after an initial stock and starvation phase (although they don’t call it that in the GAPS handbook).

So, since I had coconut flour, oil, eggs and vanilla essence ( the cheap stuff) and maple syrup to hand, I thought I’d get up early to try these out on the kids. I substituted raspberries for blueberries, which I had frozen in my fridge, and added them to the pan frozen.

The pancakes were a little tricky to flip – you want to wait until they are fairly well cooked on side one before you attempt to turn them, and the recipe made enough for the kids to have two each, and for me to have one bigger one, sprinkled with my seed mix for extra goodness.

The pancakes were a massive hit with the kids – even with Ava who professes not to like coconut, although they doused theirs in extra maple syrup, even after I served them up with sliced banana. I didn’t bother with the cashew cream in the recipe – even if I’m not working at the moment, I haven’t got time for that malarkey. I ate them with greek yoghurt and they were delicious and easy enough to make again, though probably not for a weekday breakfast.

In fact, they were gone so quickly I didn’t have a chance to take a picture but trust me, they were beautiful, even after I’d wriggled them out of the pan into scrambled ribbons – you kinda need to wipe the pan with fresh coconut oil between each round if you want them not to stick.

So, in the absence of jewelled pancakes,  here’s a pic of my green soup I’m making for lunch, alongside a beautiful loaf of sourdough I made this morning – yes, I know it seems perverse to follow grain-free pancakes with bread, but my theory these days is it’s good to mix it up a bit and keep your gut guessing – especially when I will be making good old bog standard lemon and sugar pancakes with the kids later – well it’s only pancake day once a year, after all.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s